Category Archives: Interviews

#18 Interview with Zoe Cunningham

zoe cunningham outward film networkZoe Cunningham is an award-winning technology professional and currently Managing Director of Softwire Technology, one of the Sunday Times “Best Places to Work”. In 2013 she was named as one of the 100 most influential people in Tech City, selected by the BBC as the Brightest Woman in Britain and she accompanied Prime Minister David Cameron on his trade delegation to China. Zoe also works as an actor, recently playing the lead role in Marianna Dean’s award-winning short film Symptoms and an award-nominated role in seasonal short The Christmas Movie. Zoe has published three books, her most recent entitled “An Actor’s Life” detailing her journey as an actor.

What or who was it that inspired you into a career as an actor?

I was working as the CEO of a tech company and I read a book called The Artist’s Way, by Julia Cameron, for unblocking creative people. I didn’t think I was a creative person (or blocked) but… With The Artist’s Way, you do exercises and read essays each week and on week 8 they asked “what do you really want to be doing?” and BAM I realised that I wanted to be a film actor.

Are there any actors that influenced your approach or style?

I find that acting is quite an internal process so I try not to watch other actors and mimic them. The actors I respect most are those who are versatile and draw your attention.

What’s the best bit of acting advice you’ve been given?

Oh my goodness, there is just so much. I think the best is the one that I am always trying to strive for, which is to “not act” but instead to let the work “act you”. It’s an extremely risky, terrifying and hence difficult way to go about it but you get results like nothing else.

Zoe Cunningham Look of Love

Zoe Cunningham in Look of Love.

What do you look for in a director?

I started acting in theatre and worked with two incredible directors, Peta Lily and Jeremy Stockwell. They both pushed me a long way out of my comfort zone, while only challenging me with what I could cope with. It’s really easy to either “break” a new actor or to let them be lazy about stretching themselves so I appreciate what a difficult job it was for them to get this balance right for me. In film I have a fantastic working relationship with the award-winning female director Marianna Dean. She has this unbelievable vision for the films that she directs, which means that as an actor you look great because you fit into a well-orchestrated whole. She also has a lightness of touch in directing actors. She will get the performance that she needs by working with you, not by fighting you. Every actor I know loves to work in this way.




What do you look for in a script?

Selecting scripts is a tricky business. I’ve read a lot of scripts now and things that immediately put me off are poor spelling or grammar, unrealistic dialogue or tasteless use of difficult subjects (you’d be surprised…!). Having said that it is also very personal, so anything that hits my personal passions (sci-fi, fantasy and strong female leads) can get away with a lot more J

zoe cunningham outward film network

You have experience in both acting and producing, how do you find balance within these roles during production?

Producing fits well with acting as a role. I know some people who act and direct in the same film, which seems impossible to me as I can’t imagine being both in front of and behind the camera at the same time. Production is mostly done in advance of the film starting, so prep is quite stressful but once I am on set I can hand over to a line producer and just focus on acting.

An Actors Life For Me zoe cunningham outward film networkYour third book ‘An Actors Life for Me’ is available from April. What motivated you to write the book and how did you find the experience?

My third book was inspired by my acting coach Jeremy Stockwell. He couldn’t believe that I was starting to learn to act, aged 35, without giving up my job and going to drama school. Drama school followed by a sole career as an actor is increasingly an unfeasible choice for many people, and Jeremy saw the potential in working my way, alongside a day job. He encouraged me to write down what I was doing in order to help a wider audience.

You’ve found a healthy relationship working within both technological and creative environments. What’s been the key to successfully maintaining this balance between roles?

Technology is a fantastic environment to combine with a creative one. Jobs in technology tend to be modern (the company I work for didn’t exist 20 years ago!), well-paid and flexible. Creative work is poorly paid and you are often called on to do something with very short notice. At Softwire we have many creative people as well as me, including semi-professional musicians, authors, games designers and graphic novel writers. Balance really is the key word here – you need to make enough money that you are not drained by the lack of it (so many artists quit their art because the living conditions are just too draining year after year) but dedicate enough time to art that you are fulfilled as a person and not let all your energy get sucked into your day job.

Is there anything you’d change in the film industry?

Oh goodness yes! But I’ve just started re-reading The 7 Habits of High Effective People by Steven Covey and one key principle is to work within your Circle of Influence rather than your Circle of Concern. In a nutshell that means you will achieve more by focusing on what you can change rather than fretting about what you can’t. I don’t have enough clout to impact the film industry in general, but I can make fantastic feature films featuring kick-ass women, so I’m going to focus on that instead.




Would advice would you give to any young actors starting out?

Have another way to earn a living, and make it a career, not just a side job. I get so many more things from my job than just money – connections, self-esteem and knowledge and skills. If I’d started as an actor in my 20s and waited tables to make ends meet I wouldn’t have had the chance to develop any of these skills. Don’t rely on acting for your income and make the time you spend in a second career count for you.

Website: www.zoefcunningham.com

http://bit.do/anactorslife

Twitter: @zoefcunningham

Facebook: facebook.com/zoecunninghampublic

IMDB: www.imdb.com/name/nm6147111/

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Outward Interview With ScreenBrum





#16 Interview with Scott M Wagstaff

Scott Wagstaff Interview with Outward Film NetworkScott Michael Wagstaff is an actor born in the West Midlands. After growing up in Wolverhampton he dived into the world of Musical Theatre training in Leeds & London – furthermore working on tours around Europe, Cruise Ships & shows around the world.

Scott has also appeared in various independent films, including The Time Of Their Lives featuring opposite Joan Collins and 6 Days featuring opposite Abbie Cornish.

Scott continues to develop his own projects alongside auditioning and is represented by leading talent agency Mondi Associates for the London, LA & NYC & markets.

What or who was it that inspired you into a career as an actor?

I guess I’d be expected to say De Niro in Taxi Driver, Brando in The Godfather or Pacino in Scarface and those guys are very inspiring acting geniuses & I’ve learned a lot from watching them. However, if I’m going to be super honest I’d have to say my Mom was the person who inspired me to be an actor. She was quite the entertainer herself, full of life, love, fun and certainly kept me interested in the arts in my youth.

What inspired me to be an actor is presenting an innate ability to feel and furthermore putting that message out to audiences locally and worldwide that as humans we need to feel and it is ok to. A message that resonates with me most right now off the back of the ‘what got me into acting’ is exactly how Viola Davis said it in her Oscar speech this year:

“I became an artist—and thank God I did—because we are the only profession that celebrates what it means to live a life.” – Viola Davis – Oscars 2017

That is exactly how I feel and have always felt about acting.

Are there any actors that influenced your approach or style?

I’d say James Galdolfini, may he rest in peace. Watching James gave me a great sense of what it is to be vulnerable, even in those ‘tough Italian mob’ roles there is a beautiful truth present in him. He was always human. Always himself. You can see a main with pain, joy, rage, love, seduction, literally everything and anything the moment asked of him in any performance he had to deliver. He taught me what it is to be rather than what it is to ‘act’.

What’s the best bit of acting advice you’ve been given?

Definitely from Anthony Meindl (AMAW Studios) – that acting isn’t acting, it is being. It has to be me in the situation not a ‘character’ because if I’m playing a character then I’m most likely playing an idea. If I’m playing an idea then I’m not truthfully giving myself over moment to moment within the circumstances handed to me. I’m removed by an idea of it being ‘someone else’ other than me. It has to be me. How am I in an argument over betrayal. How am I in a game of seduction and so forth. Then character is built by the audience watching me on screen in those situations with a different name and attire but it’s still me!

Yep. Still feels the best advice to date. It helps me to trust me and the people I’m working with all at once to know that.

Scott playing role of Izaak in Final Reflection 1

Scott playing role of Izaak in Final Reflection

What do you look for in a director?

Someone with a clear vision but with an openness to discovering the unknown, oh and a lotta heart! It’s really exciting to meet a Director who can visualise their creativity and can talk about their vision in an awe-inspiring way, but even more so when they admit that when rolling into production it could change. That sense of openness is important to me, it also tells me they understand actors as we all prep but then let go & have to discover our journey as it’s happening, we can’t predict the future, such as life.




What do you look for in a script?

Humanity. I’m currently filming a sci-fi where the top layer is essentially about a man who unwillingly got passed on the ability to heal with his hands. However, all the themes within the film including the healing of hands were symbolic and all connected to a father letting go of the death of his 11 year old son. Don’t get me wrong, I love action, sci-fi, thriller, fantasy, myth all that stuff, I mean hand me my cape and I’ll meet you on set! However, when there is such truth embodied within those genres that tug at the heart strings then those are the scripts that get me.

How did you find the experience of working on Time of Their Lives alongside actors such as Joan Collins and Pauline Collins?

Such fun! It was all too short lived that film. Joan and Pauline are such great artists to work with, they give you everything, even in the smaller moments they are fully there ready to deliver and willing to collaborate with you. Joan started improving with me on a couple of takes, we had just had fun, that’s all there is to it and I believe Roger Goldby is probably one of the nicest men on the planet.

Time of their lives

In addition to Time of Their Lives you also worked on the psychological horror The Dare directed by Giles Alderson. Having worked on two very different genre films, do you find working in different genres develops your ability as an actor?

Absolutely. That’s the great thing about working in different genres, the situations can become more radical in which you’re placed in & that helps growth occur. I truly believe as an actor it’s important to accept that I am everything, every part of me is available with no judgement so there isn’t any genre, role, situation that I’m unavailable for.

Is there anything you’d change in the film industry?

More film investors for more films to be made please!! 😉

Scott playing role of Gwilym in Pendulum

Scott playing role of Gwilym in Pendulum

What’s next up for you?

I’ve just finished up on a lead role in a sci-fi film then onto shooting a Major Guest Lead role for Doctors BBC next week. I also have several film projects of my own in development that I’m continuously working on around jobs/auditions also.

What advice would you give to any young actors starting out?

Any way you can. Literally any possible way. Just find a way to truly embrace who you are. Find yourself and take ownership of self. Don’t be apologetic. Be unapologetic for who you are because that is what everyone in this industry is truly interested in. You. Goes the same for your acting work, if it’s you in the moment then there is no question. Keep digging deep!

You can find Scott via the links below 

Website: http://www.scottmichaelwagstaff.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/scottmwagstaff

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ScottMichaelWagstaffOfficial/

#15. Lara Lemon Interview – Actress

Lara Lemon interview with OutwardAward winning actress Lara Lemon (SIFF Best Actress in a feature & Chelsea Film Festival Best Supporting Actress – Off-Piste – Jack in the Box Films) is experienced in film, TV and Theater.

In our interview we discuss Lara’s inspirations, experiences and her approach to working in film and on stage.

What or who was it that inspired you into a career as an actor?

I always loved being on the stage but as I was a painfully shy child, I only ever really played statues in school plays (true story). It was only once I’d joined a youth theatre at 17 that I seriously considered a career in the business. I have my parents to thank for being hugely supportive too.

Are there any actors that influenced your approach or style?

I’m forever seeing performances that make me feel a mixture of pure inspiration and ‘well, I could never top that’! I have a theory about the actors I love watching; I believe you can tell when an actor loves what they are doing as there is a sense of play. Meryl Streep, Cate Blanchett, Helen McCrory, Denise Gough, Kate Fleetwood, Billie Piper, Julie Walters, Maureen Beattie, Zawe Ashton, Olivia Colman, Parker Posey, Daniel Mays, Rory Kinnear, Leonardo Di Caprio, Stanley Tucci. I know I’ve missed so many actors off this list but it’s a start…

What’s the best bit of acting advice you’ve been given?

I’ve been lucky enough to work with some incredibly talented actor and directors who have shared invaluable advice. Most practically it would be learn your lines for auditions. But more personally, be honest and take risks are the pearls of wisdom I try and live by. And I love this quote from Gustave Flaubert – “Be regular and orderly in your life, so that you may be violent and original in your work”

Lara Lemon Interview With Outward

What do you look for in a director?

Sensitivity and honesty. I want to be challenged by a director to bring out the best work possible and if something is not working, I’d like to be told. We are all, after all, working towards the same goal: a great final product. For me, sensitivity in a director is important; to the script, to the cast, to the crew. I’ve worked with directors who have been dictatorial, bordering on bullying, and I’ve always felt like they haven’t got the best out of people. Trust throughout the team is important and this comes from the director.

What do you look for in a script?

A great story told well. I am often sent scripts to play ‘the girlfriend’ or ‘the wife’, and it can grow a bit disheartening to read parts where the character’s only purpose is to serve the man, but saying that it does appear there is a movement towards more rounded female characters in the industry. I have been lucky enough to work with some wonderfully talented film makers who are helping this shift.

You career is on the rise, with Best Actress awards on the festival circuit for ‘Off-Piste’. Would you like to discuss your career trajectory and how has it affected your creative life?

‘Off-Piste’ gave me a great platform and I’m over the moon with the awards – more than anything, it was such a confidence boost. However, I’m still working hard to secure projects I want to work on. I hope that I continue to work on exciting and challenging projects, film and stage, with as many talented people as I can.

You are a big supporter of fringe theatre and the no-low budget aspect of that arena is comparable to zero budget film. Having experienced both, would you agree with this and do you think, to allow creativity to flourish, there needs to be an attitude shift towards viewing zero budget filmmaking in the same bracket as fringe theatre?

I believe that collaboration in this industry is hugely important – not only are you able to practice your craft (whether it be acting, directing, designing, cinematography etc) but you are able to meet and work with like-minded individuals and build a network. I do think that fringe theatre and the no-low budget film industry have similarities and both face similar challenges. Unfortunately people are easily exploited in this industry which is giving true collaboration a bad reputation. It’s important to know your worth and recognise what is worth your time. I am hugely grateful for experiences I have received from fringe theatre and low budget films (‘Off-Piste’ was made for a mere £25,000!) but I’ve become a lot pickier when it comes to these projects.

What are the different challenges you face, comparing theatre to film? Do you have a preference?

I couldn’t choose one or the other – both come with different disciplines. In theatre voice is key. You need to share the story truthfully while being heard by 800 people each night. There is also the pressure of getting it technically right each night – you have no editor to make you look better! But then the beauty of stage for me is that you can return to the world and scenes night after night to try new things. Having an audience in front of you is energising and running through the play in one go builds a momentum which certainly helps with the character journey. Plus, you have the luxury of three weeks rehearsal. Filming in a non linear fashion and starting & stopping scenes are aspects of filming I find challenging, but in comparison to theatre, I love film because of the collaboration between different departments.

Lara Lemon Interview with OutwardWhat’s next up for you?

I’m back into the world of theatre for a while on a tour of ‘Strictly Murder’ by Brian Clemens. It is directed by Brian’s wonderfully talented son and film maker, Samuel Clemens, and we will be travelling all over the country from Swansea to Inverness to Eastbourne to Lowestoft. It’s a great thriller set in France just before World War II begins. Then, who knows what’s around the corner…

 

For you, what would you identify as the ‘art’ in acting and what’s your personal philosophy towards your work?

I suppose, like most actors and creatives, my belief is that the art is finding the truth in the work you do. And in terms of my personal philosophy towards my work, Judi Dench got it just right: “I think you should take your job seriously, but not yourself”.

Would advice would you give to any young actors starting out?

If you can deal with the lifestyle, stick with it – even with the lows, it is the best job in the world! Take risks. Say yes. Know your worth. Learn as much as you can from as many people as you can. Don’t beat yourself up. And be kind to people, it costs so little but means so much.

Tour dates for “Strictly Murder” can be found here… Strictly Murder Tour

You can find more information on Lara here…

Website: www.spotlight.com/5712-8979-3727

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm3738359/

Twitter: @Lara_Lemons

Instagram: @Lara_Lemons




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Interview #14 – Mike White from The Projection Booth Podcast

Mike White - The Projection Booth PodcastOver the past decade film criticism/discussion has found new and innovative ways to embrace new media. One example of this is not in written form but audio. What started in print and then onto blogs, film discussion has moved into the world of podcast.

The good movie podcasts don’t just review film but they discuss and analyse why a film is either good/bad.  The great podcasts do more than this, they explore cinematic history and talk passionately not just about films that’re popular but also films that are (in some instances) forgotten but are worthy of discussion/attention. It’s in this category where you’ll find The Projection Booth podcast.

I’ve spent many hours listening to these guys so it’s an absolute pleasure to have them agree to do an interview with us.

 

For anyone unaware of The Projection Booth podcast, how would you describe your style/format?

Every week we look at a particular film and try to examine the plot, the creation, and the impact of the work. Whenever possible, we try to get supporting interviews with the people involved in the production or experts on the subject matter.  Over the years I’ve had two main co-hosts, “Mondo” Justin Bozung and Rob St. Mary.  They’ve both since left to pursue writing projects.  For the last year I’ve had a rotating group of guest co-hosts who have brought a wide variety of viewpoints and opinions to the fray, all in the name of furthering the discussion of film.

Projection Booth podcast

How long did it take for you to find a style for the podcast, particularly with regards to length and tone?

For the first few months we were beholden to an hour length as we were being re-broadcast on a terrestrial radio station out West.  However, it was after just a handful of episodes that we began to find it impossible to keep things under an hour.   It might have been the Freaked show (Episode 11) or shortly before that but we quickly adopted what Rob St. Mary called “The Fight Club Rule of Podcasts” in that “Episodes will go on for as long as they have to.”   

In regard to tone, I think things were a bit more humorous in the beginning when Mondo Justin (Justin Bozung) was my co-host.  I’ve cut out a lot of the jokes, though I will often use sound clips as punch lines or counter-voices to discussions.  The tone of the show depends a lot on the movie being discussed but the overall “Projection Booth”-ness settled into place about a year after we started doing the show.  

A couple people have said that there’s an NPR vibe to the show, which makes sense, I suppose, as I wanted to emulate shows like Studio 360 and RadioLab.

How do you go about picking the films for each podcast?

I’ve had a working list of episodes going from about three months before the first episode ever aired.  This list could last into 2021 if I didn’t add anything to it but things are constantly being introduced and shuffled around.  

Ed Neumeier, Writer of Robocop and Starship Toopers

Ed Neumeier, Writer of Robocop and Starship Toopers

On the rare occasion, an interview opportunity will land in my lap.  Otherwise, I’ll see who I can get for a particular film before really considering doing an episode about it.  And, if I do land an interview, I’ll immediately think of other films in that person’s oeuvre that I would also want to discuss for another episode.   For example, if I can talk to an Ed Neumeier about Robocop, it’s natural that I’ll want to speak to him about Starship Troopers.    

There are a few movies that have been discussed where finding even a tangential interview subject proved challenging but that’s when it’s time to get creative.  I try to balance episodes without interviews with those that have them.  I’ve gotten a little paranoid that some people only listen to the show for the interviews… for some reason I’m suddenly reminded of Playboy.

At the end of the day, I’m choosing films that I’d like to discuss, that I think need more attention, that I think are misunderstood.  I occasionally get a suggestion from a co-host and will try my best to make a show out of those.  In 2018 I’m going to try something unusual and break open the Suggestion Box we keep on the site and see what kind of episodes I can make of them.  

Your podcasts can vary in length with some reaching the five hour mark, how long (on average) does it take to produce and create the Projection Booth podcast?

The longest episode we’ve done so far was the Conan the Barbarian show which clocked in at almost eight hours. The average length of shows is closer to two or three hours.   If one were to count all the planning, the researching, the phone calls, the editing, and the final file creation a typical show might take around 200 hours to produce.  That’s on top of my working a day job and trying to have some kind of social and family life.  Fortunately, I plan ahead quite a bit.   

I think that might also be what helps make The Projection Booth what it is; my obsessive compulsive disorder. I’m not satisfied to watch a movie and talk about it.  If I can, I want to read the book on which it was based, various drafts of the screenplay, reviews, essays, and more.  When I can, I try to dig out as many pieces about a particular film as I possibly can and create a “course pack” of material to read (and share with my co-hosts) with the hope that these various pieces can help inform the discussion even if we don’t specifically speak to them.  

Your conversational approach allows for more of an analytical study of the films you discuss on the podcast, how important is the editing process to allow for this?

Fortunately, the conversations we have on the show are pretty terrific.  I use editing to help shape them but it’s the rare occasion where I have to move sections of discussion around.  I’m usually editing out the errant “ums” or some of the more tin-eared jokes I throw out.  Honestly, I think that I cut out 5% of what my co-hosts say and 15-20% of what I have to say.  So, imagine that next time you listen to a show and hear me droning on.  My poor co-hosts have to hear even more of that!  Oh, and my obnoxious, braying laughter.

I think the most fun I have during the editing process is when I pull in sound clips as quotes from the film we’re discussing or, moreover, the clips that call back to the references that we may make.

How do you think podcasting could change film criticism?

One of my goals with the show is to bring immediacy to film.  At the same time, I’m trying my best to fill in some gaps where possible.  If anything ever smells odd about the “facts” of a film’s history, I will try to find clarity, often by going straight to the horse’s mouth.  

The preponderance of apocryphal blog posts, YouTube “essays”, and podcasts that just skim the surface and never go deeper than essentially eating each other’s vomit won’t do anything or film criticism. However, there are particular critics who do dive deep and while I don’t see them changing film criticism, I see them working more in the theoretical realm where we’re going beyond simply recapping plots and pithy comments.  It’s easy to say that a film is “good” or “bad” but it’s quite another to say why.  People remember the thumbs up or down from Siskel and Ebert but they forget the discussion that lead to the thumbs.  

Sorry for jumping on my soapbox but film criticism can be as simple as saying, “Certified Fresh on Rotten Tomatoes” or it can be something far richer.  

Your Mulholland Drive podcast is a personal favourite, how easy is it to get the likes of Laura Harring and Patrick Fischler to appear on the podcast?

I was kind of shocked that I was able to land those interviews!  I simply reached out to their representatives and they both agreed to be a part of the show.  Laura Harring really did her research on me and I’m wondering if my casual friendship with director Greydon Clark (who cast her in The Forbidden Dance, one of her early roles) had something to do with her coming on.

Laura Harring Mulholland Drive

I find that it never hurts to ask if someone will be on the show — if I can find a good contact method.  The closer I can get to the person I want to interview, that is, if I can ask them directly, I usually get a yes.  If I have to work through a publicist, I get refusals more than I get agreements.

Fortunately, that’s another area where my OCD can be a boon. I love to put on my deerstalker and tracking down addresses and contact information.

Patrick Fischler Mulholland Drive

And, by the way, I’m glad you enjoyed the Mulholland Drive episode.  I’ve had a lot of fun discussing the films of David Lynch over the last five, going on six, years and I look forward to the next one.   Perhaps one of these days I’ll get to speak to Mr. Lynch himself.

How do you compare and contrast the approach to film criticism in this verbal form compared to written?

I’m at a bit of a disadvantage when it comes to visually demonstrating my points and the lack of footnotes though that’s what the obligatory “show notes” can provide.   I’m at an advantage when it comes to having multiple points-of-view on each episode and being able to build on each other’s thoughts.   I’ll admit, too, that there have been times while I’m talking about a film I’ll suddenly make a point that I’d never considered before.  Verbalizing helps me think. And being in a “safe space” among friends can lead to throwing out some off-the-wall ideas and seeing how they play.  

Obviously, I don’t think that I can go as deep as a 5,000 word essay but I have hope that some of the interviews and discussions on the show might lead to further research by those so inclined.

Do you listen to any other film podcasts?

I do!  I really admire the amount of research that comes through in the discussions of The Feminine Critique, and Daughters of Darkness. I also frequently listen to Outside the Cinema, F This Movie, Kulture Shocked, Talk Without Rhythm, The After Movie Diner, and Badasses Boobs and Bodycounts.  You might not think so, but the two shows that I refuse to miss are comic discussions of film; We Hate Movies and God Awful Movies.

Do you think podcasting can improve considering the popularity the medium has found over the past few years?

I definitely do.  For one thing, the term “podcast” is still a foreign one to a lot of people.   I still find myself explaining

NPR’s Serial

the concept and how one can gain access to podcasts.  It’s a hidden world to too many potential listeners. NPR’s Serial helped a bring awareness to the medium though I think it could use another boost.  

One of the great things about podcasting is that anyone can do it.  It always reminds me of the old days of fanzines.  Just like with fanzines, the quality of the presentation can overshadow the content of the message — good or bad.  That said, there’s always room for improvement when it comes to technical prowess.  I own that The Projection Booth can sound better.   I’m constantly re-investing in the show though, and endeavor to do that in the future.

Do you have any tips/advice for anyone looking to start their own podcast?

The one thing that I’ve stressed to people who have asked me the same question is that podcasting doesn’t have to be an expensive proposition.  The barrier to entry is such that one can start a fairly decent show for $65.  If you don’t mind, allow me to pimp a book I wrote on that very subject, Podcasting on a Budget:

http://www.lulu.com/shop/mike-white/podcasting-on-a-budget/paperback/product-18671821.html

Additionally, I’d stress the before the microphone even goes on to decide what kind of show you’re going to have: the tone, the ground rules, and what will set you apart from other shows that might live in the same space.

You can find The Projection Booth via the links below.

Website:  http://www.projection-booth.com

Twitter:  @proboothcast

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/theprojectionbooth

 

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